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Arbitration


The Commission on Arbitration aims to create a forum for experts to pool ideas and impact new policy on practical issues relating to international arbitration, the settlement of international business disputes and the legal and procedural aspects of arbitration. The Commission also aims to examine ICC dispute settlement services in view of current developments, including new technologies.

What do we do:

Objectives:

As a forum for pooling ideas on issues relating to international arbitration and other forms of dispute resolution, the Commission aims to:  

1. promote on a worldwide scale the settlement of international business disputes by means of ICC arbitration, mediation,
   expertise, dispute boards and other forms of ADR;

2.study the juridical aspects of arbitration and other modes of settlement of disputes of an international commercial nature;

3.examine ICC dispute settlement services in view of current developments, including new technologies.

How does it work:

The ICC Commission on Arbitration and its Task Forces and Groups boast over 500 members from 90 countries, including partners in international law firms, in-house counsel, law professors, experts in different dispute resolution services, and trade executives in member companies and international organizations.ICC, as the foremost business rule-maker for international trade, sets voluntary rules that companies from all parts of the world apply to millions of transactions every year. The rules created by the Commission on Arbitration, such as the Rules of Arbitration, the ADR Rules, the Expertise Rules and the Dispute Board Rules, have become part of the legal fabric of international commerce.

For more information regarding this commission please visit: www.iccwbo.org

Commission on Banking Technique and Practice


What do we do:
The Commission on Banking Technique and Practice acts to prepare new uniform rules, to update existing uniform rules for documentary credits, collections and bank-to-bank reimbursements and to adapt international banking practices to automatic data processing techniques. It works in conjunction with the International Commercial Practice Commission and with other international bodies on demand guarantees.

Priorities :
- To serve as the global forum and rule-making body for the international trade finance community.
- Expand use of the electronic supplement to UCP 500 (eUCP).
- Target the European Commission and multinational development banks to urge them to make use of the ICC Uniform Rules for Demand Guarantees (URDG) in view of the World Bank’s incorporation of these rules into its unconditional guarantee forms.
- Explore potential for developing common practices in factoring and forfeiting.

How Does It Work:
The Banking Commission meets twice a year, once in Paris, once in another location. Commission meetings consider drafts of the new UCP revision, draft Opinions concerning queries on ICC rules submitted by ICC national committees, reports from the Task Force on Guarantees and special reports on items such as electronic commerce and trade finance. Meetings are open to members nominated by ICC national committees and also to guests for one meeting only, after which they have to become members in order to attend.

Decisions taken at Banking Commission meetings are implemented in official ICC publications and reported in the ICC quarterly newsletter, Documentary Credits Insight. ICC banking rules, which are contractual and voluntary, are implemented worldwide. ICC rules on documentary credits, presently called UCP 500, are the most successful privately drafted rules for trade ever developed and are estimated to be the basis of trade transactions involving more than one trillion dollars a year.

For more information regarding this commission please visit: www.iccwbo.org

Commercial Law and Practice


The Commission on Commercial Law and Practice (CLP) facilitates international trade and promotes a balanced self-regulatory and regulatory legal framework for international business-to-business (B2B) transactions by:

1. setting global business rules and standards that companies apply to millions of international B2B transactions every day.
2. creating model contracts that facilitate trade between countries in all stages of development and between companies of all sizes and sectors;
3.addressing the legal issues that arise from the increasing use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in international business.
4.providing leadership for the development of B2B self-regulation for an increasingly globalized market place.
5.working actively with intergovernmental organizations and, when appropriate, national governments to help shape an enabling legal and regulatory framework.

How does it work:
Key products and efforts of the CLP Commission

ICC, as the foremost business rule-maker for international trade, sets voluntary rules that companies from all parts of the world apply to millions of transactions every year. The rules of the CLP Commission, such as Incoterms 2000, have become part of the legal fabric of international commerce. The CLP Commission has also prepared a series of successful model contracts, drafted by dedicated task forces.

For more information regarding this commission please visit: www.iccwbo.org

Competition


The ICC Commission on Competition contributes world business views to governmental and intergovernmental debates on key issues in competition policy facing the international business community..

What do we do:

ICC’s views on international competition policy developments are formulated by its Commission on Competition, which gathers over 260 experts on competition law, including legal advisors from industrial and commercial enterprises and lawyers in private practice, from 40 countries. The commission identifies key issues in competition policy facing the international business community and contributes the business voice to debates to resolve these.

ICC works closely with intergovernmental organizations involved in competition policy-making, such as the World Trade Organization (WTO), the International Competition Network (ICN) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (through BIAC).

Current Priority Issues:

1. Act as the business voice in the International Competition Network and help formulate its recommendations on competition
    policy implementation, cartels and mergers .
2. Provide guidance on reform of EU rules on abuse of dominance, vertical and conglomerate mergers, and enforcement by
   private parties  .
3. Contribute international business views on competition policy developments in the US .
4. Monitor the evolution of competition policies in emerging economies .

How does it work:

ICC’s Commission on Competition encompasses a number of task forces, organized to consider and develop policy in relation to particular competition issues. The Commission on Competition also acts as a source of competition expertise for other ICC bodies. .

The Commission meets three times each year: once for the benefit of the Commission itself; once in Brussels with the European Commission; and once in the United States with representatives of U.S. institutions. As with other ICC commissions, however, the work of the Commission on Competition continues year-round through its constituent task forces.

For more information regarding this commission please visit: www.iccwbo.org

Corporate responsibility


The Commission has two main functions::

- to define the role of business in the context of globalization and changing societal expectations, and develop world business views key corporate responsibility issues..

- to encourage self-regulation by business in confronting issues of extortion and bribery, and to provide business input into international initiatives to fight corruption.

How does it work:

The Commission examines major policy issues of interest to world business.  It has over 80 members and meets twice a year. Each national committee (NC) or group may appoint delegates to represent it at meetings.  Officers of the Commission are appointed by the Chairman and Secretary General in consultation with NCs.

For more information regarding this commission please visit: www.iccwbo.org

Customs & Trade regulations


The Committee’s work focuses on customs reform and modernization and the implementation of transparent, simplified and harmonized customs policies and procedures.

What do we do:

The liberalization of world trade and investment has drawn attention to practical obstacles to the free flow of goods, services and investment across borders - in particular those related to customs policies and procedures.The central objective of the Committee on Customs and Trade Regulations is to overcome these barriers, to ensure that the liberalization of global trade and investment has a positive impact at the level of the individual international trade transaction.

Mandate: To encourage the reduction of barriers to cross-border trade related to customs policies and procedures.

Priorities:

1.Continue to lead world business input into multilateral negotiations with respect to trade facilitation. 

2.Advise governments on the enhancement of supply chain security and encourage the development of mutual recognition
  whenever possible.

3.Enhance working relationship with the World Customs Organization on a variety of topics including harmonized tariff system,
  customs valuation and business status.

4.Strengthen ICC’s leadership role in customs modernization and the simplification of trade procedures, in close collaboration
  with the WCO, the World Bank, and other bodies..

5.Work with the World Chambers Federation on engaging the SME community.

How does it work:

The Committee examines major policy issues of interest to world business.  It has over 120 members and meets twice a year.  Each national committee (NC) or group may appoint delegates to represent it at meetings.  Officers of the Committee are appointed by the Chairman and Secretary General in consultation with NCs.

For more information regarding this commission please visit: www.iccwbo.org

E- Business, IT & Telecoms


Business leaders and experts drawn from the ICC membership establish the key business positions, policies and practices on e-business, information technologies and telecommunications through the EBITT Commission. With members who are users and providers of information technology and electronic services from both developed and developing countries, ICC provides the ideal platform to develop global voluntary rules and best practices for these areas. Dedicated to the expansion of cross-border trade, ICC champions liberalization of telecoms and development of infrastructures that support global online trade and the integration of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for economic growth and social development..

Objectives:

To promote the development of electronic business and the integration of information and communication technologies through policies, standards of practice and guidelines that encourage competition, growth and the secure and free flow of information.

Formulate policies on critical telecommunications, information network security, data protection and privacy, trade-related matters, technical coordination of the Internet and jurisdiction and applicable law in e-commerce issues based on a consensus building process. .

Provide an international business interface on telecommunications, ICT and e-business issues, with all relevant intergovernmental and technical organizations, including: World Trade Organization (WTO), World Bank, United Nations Conference on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL), UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), UN ICT-related agencies and initiatives, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), G8/G20, International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), and the European Parliament and Commission of the European Union (EU).

How does it work:

The ICC Commission on E-Business, IT and Telecoms meets twice a year to discuss the work undertaken by the task forces and to outline future work items and strategy.

Mandate:

To promote the continued use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) through policies, standards of practice and guidelines to encourage the growth of e-commerce, competition, growth, predictability, compliance and, the secure and free flow of information.  

Projects :

A number of projects, products and services are managed by the ICC International Secretariat and draw upon the expertise of interested members of the EBITT Commission and other ICC Commissions.

ICC contributes its network and expertise to key global efforts to help developing countries improve and create their telecommunications, IT and e-business capabilities and infrastructures, and encourage investment and entrepreneurship.

For more information regarding this commission please visit:www.iccwbo.org

Environment and Energy


To develop business recommendations on major environmental and energy issues, and maintain ICC as the primary business interlocutor and partner in key intergovernmental negotiations and deliberations in these areas.

How does it work:

Members set the Commission’s agenda and determine priorities as well as provide officers to facilitate task forces and thematic groups in conjunction with the Commission’s secretariat in Paris. Each national committee (NC) or group may appoint delegates to represent it at meetings and officers of the Commission are appointed by the Chairman and Secretary General in consultation with NCs.

The Commission provides business input by elaborating multi-sectoral business policy positions, achievements and highlighting business solutions to environmental issues and problems. ICC works closely with the United Nations to facilitate business participation and involvement at UN-organized events, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), UN Commission on Sustainable Development (UNCSD), UN Convention on Biological Diversity (UNCBD), etc.

Moreover, Commission members gain influence at the national level through the ICC’s global network of national committees and at the international level through ICC’s privileged links with major intergovernmental organizations.

For more information regarding this commission please visit: www.iccwbo.org

Financial Services and Insurance


To break down barriers to international business in financial services and insurance, and to contribute to the elaboration of sound self-regulatory and supervisory frameworks.

What do we do:

The ICC Commission on Financial Services and Insurance is a global non-sectorally based financial services body, and looks at the full spectrum of financial services and insurance policy issues. It formulates ICC policy positions on the key regulatory and business issues facing the sector. It provides an international forum for providers, brokers and users of financial and insurance services, promotes general liberalization of services, studies practical problems and contributes to technical assistance.

Priorities:

Ensure that ICC policy statements on the liberalization of trade in financial services and in insurance have an impact on the Doha Round of WTO negotiations.

Feed business viewpoint into deliberations by national regulators, supervisors and international organizations to create efficient, stable and competitive insurance markets.

Contribute a world business viewpoint to ongoing intergovernmental discussions to promote global financial stability.

Support and further develop ICC tools, particularly ICC’s website on corporate governance (www.iccwbo.org/cg.htm) , to assist companies in dealing with corporate governance issues.

How does it work: 

The Commission examines major policy issues of interest to world business.  It has over 200 members and meets twice a year.  Each national committee (NC) or group may appoint delegates to represent it at meetings.  Officers of the Commission are appointed by the Chairman and Secretary General in consultation with NCs.

For more information regarding this commission please visit: www.iccwbo.org

Intellectual Property


The Commission on Intellectual Property contributes world business views to governmental and intergovernmental debates on key intellectual property issues facing the international business community.

What do we do:

ICC works to promote a balanced and sustainable system for the protection of intellectual property. It believes that intellectual property protection encourages innovation and the development of knowledge-based industries, stimulates international trade, and creates a favorable climate for foreign direct investment and technology transfer.

ICC’s intellectual propery policy is formulated by its Commission on Intellectual Property, which gathers over 300 business executives and private practitioners from 50 countries. The commission identifies key intellectual property issues facing the international business community and contributes the business voice to debates to resolve these. It also works to raise awareness of intellectual property by initiatives such as its annualRoadmap on Current and Emerging IP Issues for Business and other publications

ICC works closely with intergovernmental organizations involved in intellectual property policy-making, such as the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and the World Trade Organization (WTO).

How does it work:

ICC’s focus on intellectual property dates from before the time of the first World War. In the time since, ICC has become actively involved in the development of intellectual property policy, providing a voice for the business community in this rapidly changing field. The Commission on Intellectual Property works closely with other ICC Commissions to combine expertise on a number of current issues, including: access and benefit sharing (Environment & Energy), TRIPS (Trade & Investment Policy), the Internet (E-Business, IT & Telecoms) and anti-counterfeiting (Counterfeit Intelligence Bureau). It is also a main pillar of the ICC’s BASCAP (Business Action to Stop Counterfeiting and Piracy) initiative..

The Commission on Intellectual Property meets twice each year in plenary, but carries out work constantly throughout the year in issue-specific task forces. The Commission also meets regularly with representatives of WIPO and the WTO in Geneva, in addition to sending representatives to WIPO meetings, where ICC has observer status.

For more information regarding this commission please visit: www.iccwbo.org

Trade and Investment Policy


The mandate of the Commission on Trade and Investment Policy is to break down barriers to international trade and investment so that all countries can benefit from improved living standards through increased trade and investment flows.

How does it work:

The Commission examines major policy issues of interest to world business. The Commission on Trade and Investment Policy . The Commission usually meets twice a year.
Senior trade policy experts from the staff of intergovernmental organizations such as the WTO and the OECD are frequently invited to address commission meetings.
Each national committee (NC) or group may appoint delegates to represent it at meetings. Officers of the Commission are appointed by the Chairman and Secretary General in consultation with NCs.

For more information regarding this commission please visit: www.iccwbo.org

Transport & Logistics


To promote intermodal transport and competitive, efficient transport services worldwide.

Priorities:

1. Convey world business positions on initiatives to enhance supply chain security. 

2. Strongly advocate ICC recommendations for the liberalization of all transport modes to governments and intergovernmental
    organizations, including the WTO.

3. Convey world business positions on initiatives to modernize maritime and multimodal transport regimes.

4. Address the issue of insurance cover for the transport industry post September 11. 

5. Provide an industry interface with relevant organizations on the use of information technology for the facilitation of
    transport.

6. Encourage initiatives for trade and customs facilitation. 

7. Provide a forum to address and resolve documentary credit issues relating to transport documents.

8. Develop recommendations for sustainable transport.

How does it work:

ICC´s Commission on Transport and Logistics provides one of the only fora that represents all interests in the business of transport and logistics. Its overriding aim is to promote intermodal transport and competitive, efficient transport markets worldwide. Two sector-based Committees, for maritime and air transport, provide focussed bodies for specific maritime and air issues, under the umbrella of the single Commission.

The Commission on Transport and Logistics has over 240 members from 60 countries. These members include executives in charge of transport and logistics for large multinationals, shippers, freight forwarders, carriers, bankers, insurers, lawyers, industry associations and trade specialists. Certain specialized international industry organizations send observers who participate fully in the Commission´s work.

The Commission meets twice each year in plenary, but carries out work constantly throughout the year in issue-specific task forces.

For more information regarding this commission please visit www.iccwbo.org